In Pictures: How Qatar is coping with the coronavirus pandemic

With more than 400 confirmed cases, Qatar has implemented a series of measures to help contain the outbreak.

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This square in Souq Waqif, one of Doha's tourism hotspots, is usually teeming with residents and tourists. SORIN FURCOI/AL JAZEERA
This square in Souq Waqif, one of Doha's tourism hotspots, is usually teeming with residents and tourists. SORIN FURCOI/AL JAZEERA

by Hamza Mohamed & Sorin Furcoi

Doha, Qatar – Qatar has stopped all incoming flights into the country, except cargo and transit passenger flights, in a bid to stem the spread of the coronavirus.

On Tuesday, the government ordered the shutting of all shops and bank branches in commercial complexes and shopping centres, adding that part of the capital Doha’s Industrial Area will also be sealed off.

The country also announced nationwide closures of schools and universities on March 9.

On Sunday, Qatar announced a financial package that will provide incentives amounting to 75 billion Qatari riyals ($23bn) to help support the private sector during the outbreak. 

As of Wednesday, Qatar has confirmed a total of 442 confirmed cases with no deaths reported. 

The Ministry of Commerce and Industry announced that dine-in restaurants and cafes would also be closed until further notice as part of the efforts to contain the spread of the virus. [Sorin Furcoi/Al Jazeera]
The Ministry of Commerce and Industry announced that dine-in restaurants and cafes would also be closed until further notice as part of the efforts to contain the spread of the virus. SORIN FURCOI/AL JAZEERA
"On a very quiet day, we used to get 150 people. On weekends it was double that. Today we had two customers all day," said Riyaz Ijju, a barista. [Sorin Furcoi/Al Jazeera]
“On a very quiet day, we used to get 150 people. On weekends it was double that. Today we had two customers all day,” said Riyaz Ijju, a barista. SORIN FURCOI/AL JAZEERA
Takeaway and delivery services are still allowed. [Sorin Furcoi/Al Jazeera]
Takeaway and delivery services are still allowed. SORIN FURCOI/AL JAZEERA
"Before the virus outbreak, we used to make at least 1,000 Qatari riyals a day ($274). Now we don't even make 300 riyals. Both our shops are suffering because there are no customers. People are staying away," Suman Das, a pet-food seller. [Sorin Furcoi/Al Jazeera]
“Before the virus outbreak, we used to make at least 1,000 Qatari riyals a day ($274). Now we don’t even make 300 riyals. Both our shops are suffering because there are no customers. People are staying away,” Suman Das, a pet-food seller. SORIN FURCOI/AL JAZEERA
"We used to see a lot of customers, including tourists from cruise ships. But that has stopped now. I don't think this will end any time soon. Maybe the virus outbreak will last a year. I hope not but no one knows," said Saad Ismail, a pearl seller. [Sorin Furcoi/Al Jazeera]
“We used to see a lot of customers, including tourists from cruise ships. But that has stopped now. I don’t think this will end any time soon. Maybe the virus outbreak will last a year. I hope not but no one knows,” said Saad Ismail, a pearl seller. SORIN FURCOI/AL JAZEERA
The gate of a terminal for public buses displays a sign informing people that all public transport has been suspended for disinfection until further notice. [Sorin Furcoi/Al Jazeera]
The gate of a terminal for public buses displays a sign informing people that all public transport has been suspended for disinfection until further notice. SORIN FURCOI/AL JAZEERA
All forms of public transport, including buses and Qatar's newly launched metro system, have been suspended. [Sorin Furcoi/Al Jazeera]
All forms of public transport, including buses and Qatar’s newly launched metro system, have been suspended. SORIN FURCOI/AL JAZEERA
Qatar has also enforced a nationwide closure of schools and universities and public  playgrounds amid fears over the virus outbreak. [Sorin Furcoi/Al Jazeera]
Qatar has also enforced a nationwide closure of schools and universities and public playgrounds amid fears over the virus outbreak. SORIN FURCOI/AL JAZEERA
The empty seafront at Katara Cultural Village. People were advised to avoid crowded places and observe social distancing. [Sorin Furcoi/Al Jazeera]
The empty seafront at Katara Cultural Village. People were advised to avoid crowded places and observe social distancing. SORIN FURCOI/AL JAZEERA
The famous Museum of Islamic Art is one of the cultural establishments in the country that had to shut its doors as part of the measures take by the authorities to slow the spread of the virus. [Sorin Furcoi/Al Jazeera]
The famous Museum of Islamic Art is one of the cultural establishments in the country that had to shut its doors as part of the measures take by the authorities to slow the spread of the virus. SORIN FURCOI/AL JAZEERA
People at the departure terminal at Hamad International Airport. All incoming flights have been suspended for a preliminary two-week period. [Sorin Furcoi/Al Jazeera]
People at the departure terminal at Hamad International Airport. All incoming flights have been suspended for a preliminary two-week period. SORIN FURCOI/AL JAZEERA
The economic and financial package will provide incentives amounting to 75 billion Qatari riyals ($23bn) to help support the private sector during the outbreak.  [Sorin Furcoi/Al Jazeera]
The economic and financial package will provide incentives amounting to 75 billion Qatari riyals ($23bn) to help support the private sector during the outbreak. SORIN FURCOI/AL JAZEERA